social media tips

Responding to Reviews

Whether it be rants or rave reviews, we've all seen our fair share of commenters and consumers share both positive and negative feedback via social media regarding a product or service. With the growth and expansion of social media platforms as a connection between businesses and their customers, interaction between the two has increased, for better and for worse.  

Reviews, both good and bad, can serve as an opportunity to grow and expand your brand, while also increasing customer satisfaction and positive perception about your company. So, how do you turn what could be a negative into a positive?  

The answer lies in a few deep breaths and a well thought-out response.  

Responding to reviews might seem like a daunting task, best left to the lion-taming type. However, with a little reconnaissance and some careful wording, customer reviews could turn into a tool to reach out to a larger audience.  

  • Relax. Don't do it. The first step to intelligently responding to reviews is to stay calm. Negative reviews can be unpleasant and, sometimes, downright rude. However, as the Rudyard Kipling saying goes, "If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you..." Well, let's just say that keeping a cool head is always the better way to go.  
When you do get a negative review, the first thing you should do is take a breather,” said Shama Kabani, author of The Zen of Social Media Marketing and CEO of The Marketing Zen Group, in an article on forbes.com. “You don’t want to fly off the handle and do something to make yourself look bad. Especially if you think the customer complaint is false, your instinct is to react in the heat of the moment. But you’ll regret it. 
  • Linda, Linda, listen. It's no secret that negative reviews on social media can be a good way to get feedback on your business, products and services. If a customer voices their concerns or complaints, listen to what they have to say. Not only is this a good chance to potentially improve upon something within your company, but this is also an opportunity to retain a dissatisfied customer, if handled correctly.  

 

  • By all means, move at a glacial pace... When responding to reviews, it's important to respond quickly. With the speed of social media, things are constantly changing. Within hours, newsfeeds refresh and trends come and go. A quick response time shows that you're attentive toward the concerns of your customers. Many social media professionals suggest that your response time should be within a 60-minute window.  

 

  • #sorrynotsorry When responding to a review, apologize... and really mean it. A sincere apology can go a long way with your social media followers. It puts you in a human light and often garners sympathy about the situation from others.  

 

  • Private eyes. If at all possible, move the conversation away from public view. Solving customer concerns could be a lengthy process, better accomplished through direct message, email or a phone call. Not only will this allow you to get more detailed feedback, but you also have the opportunity to remedy a problem and shift attention on the problem away from the public eye. 

Does Your Business Need a Pinterest? We Think Yes.

Pinterest…really? Okay, we get it.

However, according to Pinterest’s blog back in September 2015, the site has over 100 million monthly active Pinners. “But Pinterest is just for women,” you might say. Not true, folks! According to Ahalogy, the monthly active male population that joined Pinterest grew 120% in the year of 2015.  Check out this article on Business for Pinterest’s blog to see more statistics and facts. 

Bianca Bosker of The Huffington Post wrote back in 2012 that the secret to Pinterest’s success is that we are all sick of each other

What sets Pinterest apart and makes it so appealing is its focus on who we want to be—not on what we’re doing, where we’ve gone, how important we are or how beloved.” Indeed, the site is unique because the goal of its users is not to get more and more followers; rather, Pinterest users seem to be content with sharing ideas—not about themselves—with smaller pools of people.

So why is this good for your business, and how do you most effectively use it? Wouldn't you know, we’ve got three tips for you

1. Pinterest drives traffic to your site. 

Let’s face it: Pinterest may be one of the best ways to showcase your business’ products. Not only does Pinterest integrate your entire web presence—bringing together your website, Twitter, and Facebook—it can help you discover what your buyers want to have. 

This also means that you’ll want your site to be Pinterest-friendly. Adding the Pin It button to your website will allow your viewers to easily pin your pictures and products to their Pinterest pages, which will only continue the traffic you receive from Pinterest. 

Furthermore, you can go to Pinterest’s Business page and get more information on adverting with Promoted Pins. 

2.  Link, add descriptions, and use correct keywords.

Some of the biggest marketing mistakes made on Pinterest come when businesses forget to add descriptions or use the incorrect keywords. 

Paige Velasquez, social media strategist and Pinterest specialist at Shelton Interactive says this:

The biggest mistake brands and businesses can make on Pinterest is not utilizing the Guided Search tool to their advantage. When creating descriptions for pins, it's important to understand exactly what the user might be searching [for] when looking for a specific pin. The Guided Search tool allows brands to discover what specific terms a user will most likely search for based on a keyword. Creatively using the key terms that come up on the Guided Search in your pin description will most likely make your pin more discoverable when users are searching for specific pins.

Incorporating these details can take a little extra time, but they will help you gain the most traffic! 

3. Once you get that traffic, don’t forget to engage. 

Once everything is correct and in its place, you’ll have to make sure to post engaging content. The more you pin, like, and share, the more visibility you will gain. However, it’s a two-way street, and you do not want to post too much of your own content. You also don’t want to leave up outdated content. A good mix of diverse, fresh posts is the key to winning over your Pinterest followers. By engaging properly, you will create a subtext that says, “this company cares.”

While it is good to just have a presence, it is even better when you create a call to action. Your followers are always looking for more, more, more, and you must give it to them! Don’t be afraid to caption your posts and pins in such a way as to create the response you are seeking. “Tell them to visit the website for ore information, order, re-pin, etc.,” says Tim Lavelle, director of SEO and social media at U.S. Interactive Media. 

We couldn't agree more.

Do you use Pinterest in your business? If so, what kind of ROI have you seen?