Halloween

A Magazine Resurrection

We're pleased as punch that our Linked Magazine editor, Meg, decided to grace us with her blogging presence with this little entry on why magazines are still relevant. It's a resurrection just in time for Halloween. Enjoy!

Every writer is also an avid reader and a critical thinker.

We inhabit a space that's hard to describe unless you've been there - in which case, no explanation is needed. We always set out to keep ourselves out of a story, and we inevitably either draw on some personal experience to give depth to a piece, or become so personally touched by the subject of our writing that we leave a bit of ourselves in it. Writing is hard. It’s a constant state of self-examination and self-evaluation. Every comma becomes personal; every line as much art to us as the stroke of a brush to the painter or the contouring of a shape to a sculptor. Fortunately, professional writers (a category I find myself in, incidentally) have thick skins. So after we craft our art, we cut and edit it. We try to surgically remove our bias from our writing. Sometimes it hurts and sometimes you really think that last sentence shouldn't have been cut, but you hit publish (or send to the printers) and hope for the best.

Years ago, if you had told me that I would be at the helm of six magazines by the age of 24, I would have laughed. Magazines were declared a “dying” form of journalism so long ago, it's hard to see how they aren't already dead. Except, they aren't dying. That’s never been the case. They’re changing and adapting, and technology has allowed writers to connect with audiences on a much more intimate level than ever before. We can reach more people and get feedback in real-time after our magazines hit doorsteps. 

Dying? No. Evolving? Absolutely.

So before you discount long-form journalism, remember everything is cyclical. We live in an age where more young people choose to scroll through pictures on instagram than read the words in Facebook statuses, and where folks get their news in 140-character snippets from Twitter. But even now, it looks like that 140-character limit may increase. Buzzfeed has reinvested in longform journalism, and most comprehensive journalistic work in the world is being done for newspapers and magazines - articles measured in pages, not characters. Magazines matter just like stories matter. They connect us; they remind us why we cared in the first place. Linked Magazines are hyper-local. Our goal is to connect people by telling stories about the people and places around them. By covering stories in communities around the metro that aren’t being told elsewhere and by highlighting people and groups doing good—real good for people you know (or should know, if you’re new), we’re helping communities connect and grow.  

Magazines do a better job at this than any other form of media out there. They have staying power and allow us to spend more time with our subjects. When I’m writing a story, I don’t have to worry about hashtags or SEO. I’m focused on you, the reader. I’m focused on delivering you beautiful photos and stories to match. I’m I'm focused on sending you a magazine you'll pick up and read. I’m focused on your community, your story and your world.

What do you think about magazines? Do you enjoy long-form journalism? 

The Intern Files: Darken the Lipstick “Forevermore”

 

Once upon a lipstick dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,

Over many a quaint, bright, or curious color in the store—

While I searched, eyes promptly stopping—suddenly the color, popping,

As of some one pointing quickly, making me search no more.

“Tis my color,” I held it up, “this is it, I know for sure—

The color I’ve been waiting for.”

I’ve never been much of a lipstick gal, but this sure was a fun experiment.

Dark lipstick is IN, and what better time to try something new than in the month of Halloween, a time of costumes and all things outrageous?

Elle.com says ‘90s lips are back, from maroon to deep purple-reds to black shades. The lipstick trend that drove parents crazy in the ‘90s is back and more powerful than ever. Thefashiontag.com calls the throwback trend a little more 90s-mixed-with-70s: “glam but dark”. 

Trends are funny things.  Our culture loves them because they are fast-acting, short-lived blasts of novelty. Trends operate to catch our attention, so it is often our lack of attention (mindless scrolling) that draws us in. That’s not all bad though, right? Right! In doing some research, I stumbled across a study performed by Dr. Nico Bunzeck and Dr. Emrah Düzel. It explained that the part of human brains associated with reward circuitry is stimulated when presented with something new. Meaning, new things (like trends) give us neural payoff, almost like learning enhancement. Why do you think that we all know what’s trending on Twitter? It’s because we crave learning new things. 

New things stick with us, and something as simple as trying a new lipstick trend could help us learn things about ourselves. Trends are not only sources of novelty, but also sources of reinvention. So next time you’re thinking about trying out that new trend (like dark, dark lipstick), go all out for it! Maybe the newness will stick and you’ll transform into a new you—forevermore.  

What trends have you tried?

Source: Bunzeck and Düzel